Archive for the ‘Animation’ Category

Blonds with Boobs on Death Battle

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

I sometimes find the match pairings from Screw Attack to be questionable.  I have no question why they’re pitting the Dragonball Z fembot character against Carol Danvers: they’re both chicks with boobs and blond hair.  It’s just sex. There’s nothing thematically interesting nor an organic narrative available.

I imagine the internet was hoping fM.90.msmarvelor this. I haven’t seen the demand.Android18

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Naturally the result is this:

Ms._Marvel_Vol_1_17

Pinky and the Brain at Dragon Con

Friday, August 8th, 2014

Pinky and the Brain

Here is a convention panel with Maurice LaMarche and Rob Paulsen. I love to hear my favorite cartoon characters cuss.

Iron Giant as Superman

Tuesday, July 29th, 2014

Nothing I can say can really match the quote I used…. well, I could write something that is as good, but the theology seems inappropriate for this blog….. maybe on Apologies Demanded.

Iron Giant Superman

Titular Iron Giant as thematic Superman

From Jim MacQuarrie:

The Iron Giant is the purest illustration of faith ever recorded.

It’s not just that the giant chooses to be Superman; it’s that he does so in the face of all reason and evidence. He looks like a monster; he’s a giant metal man from space who shoots lasers out of his eyes and can crush cars in his fingers. Every fiber of his being screams that he is the metal monster from space sent to destroy us all, everyone he meets is afraid of him, he has every reason to see himself as others see him, and yet…

and yet…

…he chooses, through sheer force of will alone, to reject his origin and nature and become Superman, a character he bears no resemblance to at all. He has no reason to want to be Superman, not one thing to suggest that he CAN be Superman, nothing except Hogarth’s word for it, and that’s good enough. By faith alone, he declares that he is Superman, and when the need arises, it turns out that he IS Superman, simply because he had faith that he could be.

(more…)

Batman versus The Terminator

Tuesday, February 25th, 2014


Terminator Batman by ChrisWeyer on deviantART

It is an animated fan film conceived by Tony Guerrero and animated by Mitchell Hammond. I like it.

Man of Steel Animated Series

Monday, December 23rd, 2013

What’s the one thing everyone is going to remember about Man of Steel in five years?*SNAP!*

The Batman got too much spite

Monday, October 7th, 2013

Mark Pellegrini, the guy who runs the TMNT Entity blog, wrote a comparison between the Batman cartoon immediately after the Dini/Timm Batman/Justice League animated cycle and its predecessor, arguing that objective overall superiority of the DC Animated Universe stuff aside and the 1990s series especially, The Batman and its five seasons got short shrift.

now that both the DCAU and The Batman are but memories distanced by years and a multitude of newer cartoons and straight-to-video animated films clogging our DVRs, I think it’d be a good idea to discard the bitterness of the Bat-Embargo and judge The Batman against its holy brethren of the 1990s, Batman: The Animated Series, a bit more objectively.

Okay, so even objectively, Batman: The Animated Series wipes the floor with The Batman; like Hell I’m here to argue that. Instead, I think the safer activity to pursue is determining what aspects of the Caped Crusader’s mythos The Batman actually succeeded over Batman: The Animated Series in adapting and improving upon.

It is disturbing how correct he is. There is much to rip on in the first season of The Batman, including but not limited to how many of the characters’ first appearances involve less profitable crime and more the destruction of the city as facet or totality of the evil act.  There is also at least two episodes early on where Gotham City’s fate hinged on unlikely city planning.  In the episode where Killer Croc intends to flood the city that fate literally hinged on a switch that would “flood” or “not flood” the city.  The initial Mr Freeze episode was predicated on the entire metropolitan area having central heating and air systems.

There was also the far more naked use of concepts designed for toys, the Batwave coming to mind immediately.

The article does not mention any of that and it is absolutely correct to do so.  The article exists to extoll virtues of the program, not pound endlessly on what was wrong, which we in the internet and on our couches have certainly done already, far too much yet completely fairly.

So the article touches upon what The Batman did correctly, especially where The New Batman Adventures failed in a comparative place.

That said, I like these paragraphs:

On one hand, it wants to be a gritty and intelligent look at the psychological aspects of Batman’s adventures with daring plots and grim consequences, but then it also wants to be a fun and lighter take on the character where he eats enchiladas, pilots a giant robot and has kung-fu battles with the Penguin. The Batman wanted to be both kinds of shows and while it did strike that necessary balance from time to time, mostly it was a whole lot of nonsense and Greg Weisman phoning it in while waiting for that Spectacular Spider-Man gig to come along.

Perhaps its greatest hurtle during its initial run, though, was just the fact that it was the successor to the DC Animated Universe and that meant it was going to have a lot of guys in their early twenties who were going to hate it simply for existing. The fact that it ran concurrently with the last season of Justice League Unlimited, resulting in the infamous “Bat-Embargo” surely didn’t help (the Bat-Embargo prevented Batman’s supporting characters and villains from appearing in JLU as The Batman had exclusivity rights to them).

In other words, The Batman performed certain bits better because The Animated Series failed.

is this Gundam timeline helpful or accurate?

Monday, October 7th, 2013

Does this accurately represent the Gundam “Correct Century” timeline?


I’m not even certain what “Correct Century” means. I watched a good deal of a few shows within the continuity of the original series and some episodes in the continuities that are more fantastical but the graphic seems cut in bad places and my memory is a little rusty after ten years.

Mark Hammill finds out Data is the Joker

Thursday, September 26th, 2013

what I hate about super speedster fights

Monday, August 26th, 2013

They seem awfully arbitrary.

Would a fight between two super-speedsters be like two normal guys fighting? After all, to each other they’re not moving at super speed at all, but normal speed relative to one another. Should a punch for one have relativistic effects?

So if one is in the air and is no longer moving at super speed and can not affect his position the other is attacking at high speed, right? Can one attack the other with super speed when the other is stationary and still have it be super speed or is it still just normal speed?

Why do they run? When/if I fight another normal person I don’t run around while punching him in the face. I just punch a guy. How does running grant the Flash an advantage over Reverse Flash if they’re really just running at a slow speed relative to one another. Olympic athletes wouldn’t have a fist fight like this.

And that is just what makes no damn sense in a fight BETWEEN super speedsters. What about a fight between a super speedster and a guy without super powers?

Breaking Bad Star Trek animated thingima

Thursday, August 15th, 2013

All I have to say is that there were no replicators in the original Star Trek series. Also I have never seen Breaking Bad so if you want adequate context you are out of luck there.

John DiMaggio is a pop icon?

Saturday, August 10th, 2013

Well I can buy that Bender is a pop icon.

Even John DiMaggio had a beginning

Friday, August 9th, 2013

John DiMaggio had an origin story?

I guess so!

 

 

When you have a gulf or distinction in the state of being between what you are now as a profession and what you were then I suppose it qualifies as an origin story.

John DiMaggio talking about Adventure Time

Thursday, August 8th, 2013

I have no idea what Adventure Time is.

 

 But the internet will help us here.

Come to think of it I think I saw a fraction of this show while I was in a video rental store looking for a job application.

John DiMaggio on the formula for Bender

Wednesday, August 7th, 2013

Voice actor John DiMaggio, known to many of us for voicing Bender on Futurama and a nearly spot-on Joker in the Batman Red Hood straight-to-DVD movie, tells us about he puts together various elements of impressions and vocal artifacts to perform his Bender voice.

 

I will say outright that due to the limitations of biology and physiognomy I can almost instantly detect John DiMaggio behind a character he plays. Yet this certainly is not a knock because despite what all of his characters have in common to make the man recognizable his characters do not sound at all like John DiMaggio. Bender does not sound like John DiMaggio. I did not know that until I saw this video.

Tom Kenny interview on voice acting

Wednesday, August 7th, 2013

I don’t care about Spongebob and that is Tom Kenny’s claim to fame but I know him as Starscream and the Penguin, among others.

 

I cannot believe that interviewer host guy on “Attack of the Show” has this job.  That sounds too mean.  I hope he never interviews me for a job.

why I don’t like the Ultimate Spider-Man cartoon

Tuesday, July 30th, 2013

I’m feeling especially derivative here.

1. They (Jeff Loeb) canceled Spectacular Spiderman which was debatebly the best Spiderman show/adaptation to date.
2. Ultimate Spiderman, even though it has Ultimate in the title, has almost nothing to do with the Ultimate Spiderman comic universe.
3. Spiderman acts more like Deadpool than Spiderman (continiously breaking the 4th wall), not to mention the TERRIBLE jokes, compared to the cracking jokes from the comics (or Spectacular Spiderman/90’s Spiderman TAS)

I liked all Spectacular Spiderman episodes, only liked 3~4 episodes of the episodes aired thus far (First episode with Hulk as Guest Star, Green Goblin 2-parter and S2 episode with the Lizard).
I grew up with the 60’s spiderman cartoon (which aired during the 80’s too), but mostly the 90’s Spiderman (and X-men) cartoon.
For me it is now Spectacular > 90’s Spiderman > Spiderman Unlimited > MTV’s Spiderman > Ultimate Spiderman > 60’s Spiderman.

I mostly blame Jeff Loeb though. Ever since his kid died of cancer, it seems he has made it his job to cancel good stuff and replace it with crap.
He canceled:
Wolverine and the X-men, which was imo a great show compared to X-Men Evolution (But slightly less good than X-Men TAS)
Spectacular Spiderman
Avengers Earth’s Mightiest Heroes with HIS new (ultimate) avengers show so it can be in the same continuity as Ultimate Spiderman. Plus Loeb is against “story arcs”. Heck, to save face he said that the new show will be a “continuation” of the previous Avengers:EMH and resolve some of the plot lines. Which fans of the 3 above shows know Loeb is lying about.

My reasons specifically is that

  1. I liked Spectacular Spider-Man and while I understand that Marvel/Disney/Loeb cancelled a successful cartoon show to make more money, assert creative control, centralize licensing, and have a Spider-Man show with Marvel guest stars, they did so by eliminating a program before the story arcs could be resolved.  In doing so they also terminated a good program.
  2. Deadpool is a multifaceted character who has, as part of his schtick, a habit of breaking the fourth wall.  Breaking the fourth wall is where the character is not simply narrating or thinking but addressing the viewer directly and taking his personal narrative out of the story.  That schtick is not part of a Spider-Man’s repertoire.    He doesn’t do that.  Deadpool does do that.  This Ultimate Spider-Man cartoon has Spider-Man making less wisecracks to the villain and telling less jokes.  Instead he breaks the fourth wall for comedy.  Many fans of the show, bless them for having whatever tastes float their respective boats, assume that that sort of comedy is inherent to the character when in fact this is a first for him.  Deadpool is appearing on the cartoon show, taking his normal schtick with him.  This will not help Spidey stay unique on his own show.

TMNT Entity, as a blog of note

Saturday, June 1st, 2013

In my ongoing pedantry I’ve been stuck on the idea (since I learned of it, probably from Elliot S. Maggin’s Superman novel Miracle Monday, I think) that the word “fan” meant “fanatic”, which meant there was a distinct difference between “I like this” and “I am a fan”.

So while I’ve certainly watched most of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle cartoon shows, and a high percentage of the episodes I can definitely tell you that I am not a fan, as I never watched all of them.  I really really like the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.  It’s a great concept and it sprung from a comic book back in the early 1980s and from there it because three live action films from New Line, a cartoon from Fred Wolf Films that was both UHF syndicated and aired on CBS in later seasons simultaneously, a FOX children’s cartoon show made with non-union voice actors whose primary jobs were dubbing Japanese anime released in this country, a FOX Kids live-action television series made by the producers of the Power Rangers, a syndicated daily newspaper comic strip, a comic book series from Archie Comics spinning off of the 1980s cartoon series, an anime, a comic book series from IDW, a CGI-animated film, a straight-to-television animated film, prose novels for children, a Nickelodeon-owned CGI-animated cartoon series, a ton of action figure sets, each released for a different children’s cartoon series,  and that does not include all of the licensed merchandise like lunch boxes, mugs, t-shirts, tooth brushes, underpants, etc. Knowing that sounds like obsession.  Sadly remembering that information off the top of my head is how my brain works.  It collects and retains knowledge of useless stuff I learned decades ago with amazing retention of detail.  I think it’s a learning disorder because I’ve been meeting people lately and I swear that despite the familiarity they show I don’t even remember their faces (it’s probably less rude to be honest and ask how we last met rather than lie to them even convincingly).

Now because I like TMNT, a lot, but am not an actual honest to goodness fan, I only read TMNT Entity on occasion.  Mark Pellegrini is a fan, as in fanatic, and I will not fault him for it.  (And why should I fault him for it?  I’m a fan of Spider-Man and Batman, and certain eras of Star Wars and Transformers).  The man seems to have taste and his knowledge of the subject seems immense.  He is also extremely well-read in terms of the given material, as well as enough other things that we don’t have to worry about him not knowing if something is based off of something else.

I’m holding back a little, in part because there’s something else of his I want to praise later and give that more time.

As it is while Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles as a franchise is certainly well-known among cable-watching children today, and adults who were children in the eighties and nineties, with a viewing audience that sadly dwarfs the reading audiences of major comic book series, it is all still based on an series of comic books that were published by Mirage Comics. They were created by Peter Laird and Kevin Eastman, at first as a spoof of Frank Miller’s Daredevil and then as an action adventure series with a side of comedy.  The average intended output was six issues a year and whose average actual output was four issues a year.  I’m fairly certain that as it was an independent comic book with that distinct flavor it sold less than Superman and X-Men and perhaps the people that were readers of only the Big Two back in the early eighties did not know it existed.  Or maybe they did.  I was born in 1981, what do I remember?

From the Mirage Comic was licensed a cartoon series and spun from that cartoon series was a comic book series published by Archie Comics, licensed from Mirage, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Adventures.  So an independent comic with an erratic output beget a daily cartoon show beget a monthly comic book.  I’m fairly certain that the audiences for the two comics were such that it was not an actual competitive product, any more than the Super Friends comic was a competitor of the Justice League of America.

The Mirage Universe version of the Turtles made many many canonical appearances not simply in their own regular comic book (of which there were three volumes, or four depending on who you ask), but in various anthologies and Micro-Series one-shots, as well as numerous back-up stories.  In fact whenever Mirage published a reprinting of one of their issues they made certain that new material was included, usually back-up stories which fit into the overall continuity.

This makes recognizing/establishing a continuity of these characters a formidable task at best.  But the writer of TMNT Entity did it, right here.  Now as fascinating as I find the whole story, both of how the comic was made, how the company worked, and the events of the characters themselves, I still am not a fan of the original Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles series, or any of the franchise as a whole.

But I liked it a lot.  I watched every episode I could as a kid. I thought the action figures were cool.  And so the TMNT burnt into my brain.

Why can’t our car ads be this good?

Thursday, April 25th, 2013

Remember the Wacky Races?

Now…check this out!!!

Transformers Prime season 3 is final season

Tuesday, March 12th, 2013

transformers-prime-optimus

via press release:

EMMY® AWARD-WINNING “TRANSFORMERS PRIME” RETURNS FOR

THIRD AND FINAL SEASON WITH A NEW FOE: THE PREDACONS!

The Series Also Debuts with a New Name –

“Transformers Prime Beast Hunters”

 

Special Four-Hour Catch-Up Marathon Kicks Off

The Final Chapter on March 22

 

LOS ANGELES – The Hub TV Network, the fastest growing children’s cable network, announces the return of the third and final season of the Daytime Emmy® Award-winning CG-animated series “Transformers Prime Beast Hunters” from Hasbro Studios on Friday, March 22. The epic saga’s return presents a formidable new opponent for the Autobots and the introduction of a third dragon-like faction called the Predacons. A special four-hour marathon (3:30–7:30 p.m. ET) of back-to-back episodes from the series’ second season will run leading up to the season-three premiere which debuts at 7:30 p.m. ET.

 

In the half-hour action series, the epic battle with the Decepticons rages on as Optimus Prime leads his team of Autobots and three human children in a mission to defend Earth and one day restore his home planet of Cybertron. But a brand new enemy emerges that could turn the tide of the war in Megatron’s favor.

 

In the season-three premiere episode, the survival of Optimus Prime is in doubt after Megatron’s destruction of the Autobot base on Earth, while the separated members of Team Prime try to reconnect after being scattered to the wind to prevent detection. The final 13 episodes will see Optimus Prime and his team face their greatest challenge yet in a new foe dedicated to the destruction of the Autobots — and potentially, planet Earth.

 

To “roll out” the final season, The Hub will host a special LA-based, invitation-only, World Premiere Screening Event of the first two episodes of “Transformers Prime Beast Hunters” followed by a Q&A session with cast and executive producers. The show’s passionate fans will be able to win tickets to the VIP screening through contests held on various online sites.

 

Additionally, starting Friday, April 19 (7:30 p.m. ET), the first four episodes of the new season will have special encore presentations that include “Autobits” — behind-the-scenes trivia with exclusive in-picture commentary designed to create an immersive viewing experience. Additional new episodes will resume in May.

 

On hubworld.com, an all-new show-page design for “Transformers Prime Beast Hunters” will feature exclusive images and video clips, as well as a countdown clock for the season three premiere. Additionally, two brand new games will launch on Friday, March 15 to support the new season. “Relic Hunter” features beloved character Arcee on a mission to Antarctica where she must navigate nine frozen trails to recover an ancient Ionian relic. “Pulsar Defense” features a battle between good and evil as the Autobots race to build up their defenses against the Decepticon’s ultimate weapon that threatens to destroy them all.

 

Finally, The Hub’s Facebook and Twitter (@HubTVNetwork) platforms will also provide sneak peeks and exclusive content from the new season and extend the viewing experience with additional activities to engage fans of all ages.

 

The Hub Original Series “Transformers Prime” was honored in 2012 with two Daytime Emmy® Awards, including Outstanding Special Class Animated Program. The wins bring to four the total number of Daytime Emmy® Awards the animated series has received since it premiered in November 2010.

 

“Transformers Prime Beast Hunter” is executive produced by Duane Capizzi (“The Batman,” “Superman: Doomsday”), Jeff Kline (“Jackie Chan Adventures,” “Men in Black: The Animated Series”), Alex Kurtzman, and Roberto Orci (Star Trek, Cowboys & Aliens, and Transformers feature films and TV’s “Fringe” and “Hawaii Five-O”). Peter Cullen, Frank Welker, Josh Keaton, Jeffrey Combs, Kevin Michael Richardson, Ernie Hudson, Gina Torres, John Noble, GeorgeTakei, Markie Post, and Steve Blum lend their voices to the series, which is produced by Hasbro Studios.

 

Later this year, fans can look for a 75-minute “Hub Original Family Movie,” titled “Predacons Rising,” which will also be available on DVD.

It’s Uncanny, This Valley: The Ups And Downs Of Cinematic CGI InHumanity | Pajiba: Reviews, News, Quotes & Cultural Commentary

Friday, September 30th, 2011

I love this quote:  “Caesar will always look computer generated in the same way Roger Rabbit will always be a cartoon, but his face expresses more genuine human emotion than James Franco ever will.”

via It’s Uncanny, This Valley: The Ups And Downs Of Cinematic CGI InHumanity